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The Cryo-EM platform receives grant from the Swedish Research Council

Original article was published by SciLifeLab, available here: https://www.scilifelab.se/news/151-million-grants-improves-scilifelab-services?utm_campaign=nyhetsbrev&utm_medium=email&utm_source=apsis

151 million SEK grants will vastly improve SciLifeLab platform services

Sandblad Linda 2929 131126 MPNNew grants from the The Swedish Research Council will allow SciLifeLab platforms and units to double screening capacity, acquire high-end instruments and conduct large scale clinical trials. In this Q&A we check in with platform directors to get an idea of what is coming.

SciLifeLab platforms and units have as part of the call Grant for investment in existing research infrastructure received 151 million SEK from The Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) – Sweden’s largest governmental research funding body, that “supports research of the highest quality within all scientific fields”. As a comparison, the core funding of SciLifeLab’s entire national research infrastructure was 217 million SEK in 2021. So, how will the platforms and units use this, quite substantial, sum of money? We asked the three SciLifeLab-related applicants that received the highest grants to tell us about their hopes and aims with the new funding.

Linda Sandblad, Platform Scientific Director at the Umeå node of the Cryo-EM SciLifeLab Infrastructure Unit, MIMS Team Leader, applied for the grant to expand the screening resources, and will receive 22,5 million SEK.

Read more: The Cryo-EM platform receives grant from the Swedish Research Council

MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Thanat Chookajorn

Text written by Nóra Lehotai and Thanat Chookajorn. Pictures owned by Thanat Chookajorn and Mahidol University, Thailand.

Thanat1I interviewed Thanat Chookajorn, who joined the Billker lab at MIMS in March 2021. Thanat shares his life with his partner and their two dogs. Before this phase in his career, he studied or worked in several countries around the world: Thailand, his homecountry, the US, the UK, Spain, Israel (which he is very fond of), Russia and Cambodia.

 

 

 

Picture: Thanat Chookajorn. Credit: Mahidol University, Thailand. 

Read more: MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Thanat Chookajorn

Welcome to the 9th National Infection Biology / Swedish Microbiology Meeting

BANNER ABSTRACT BOOK 1920x1260The 9th National Infection Biology/Swedish Microbiology Meeting, 16-18 November 2021, will be a virtual meeting that aims to provide a broad vision on current state-of-the-art microbiology techniques and research in Sweden. Keynote speakers are Swedish researchers working within the sub-disciplines of bacteriology, virology, parasitology, host response, clinical infection biology, environmental microbiology, zoonotics, and new methods. To involve junior researchers, additional talks will be selected from the submitted poster abstracts. Poster presentations will be organized as digital poster walks that allow participants to present and discuss their work with other participants.

Click on Read more to find out where can you find more information about the programme and registration. 

Read more: Welcome to the 9th National Infection Biology / Swedish Microbiology Meeting

MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Lana Jachmann

Text written by Nóra Lehotai and Lana Jachmann. Pictures owned by Lana Jachmann.

In the frame of this MIMS Spotlight Series, I interviewed Lana Jachmann who joined the Sixt lab in June 2021. She moved to Umeå from Germany to start the next phase of her scientific carreer. 

Can you tell us about your role at MIMS, what are you working on now? 

LJI joined Barbara Sixt’s lab as a research assistant, with the goal to stay long term as a PhD student. I am studying a bacterial pathogen, called Chlamydia. More specifically, I aim to determine the role of the Chlamydia-containing vacuole in counteracting the intrinsic defense responses of infected host cells. To do so, I am using a lot of microscopic and molecular biology techniques.

 

 

 

Picture: Lana Jachmann.

Read more: MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Lana Jachmann

MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Takahiro Ishizaki

Text written by Nóra Lehotai and Takahiro Ishizaki. Pictures owned by Takahiro Ishizaki.

I had a chat with Takahiro, a postdoctoral fellow in the Bushell group. He joined MIMS in May 2021, leaving behind his parents and girlfriend in Japan for a while. 

Can you tell us about your role at MIMS, what are you working on now?

TI 1I am working as a postdoc in Ellen Bushell’s group thanks to a 2-year scholarship from Japan. This type of scholarship is to encourage Japanese postdocs to go abroad, covering both travel fees and my salary.

The Bushell group is focusing mainly on the host-pathogen interaction of the malaria parasite. I have a molecular biology background and I characterized the signalling proteins of the parasite, both in the erythrocyte invasion, using genetic modification approaches like CRISPR/Cas9 and inducible knock-outs, and also the time-lapse live imaging analysis. Here in Umeå, I expand the experiment scale using the PlasmoGEM knock-out library and determine the parasite signalling proteins associated with the sensing of the host environmental conditions. I am also trying to establish and optimize the conditional knock-out method, which could be applied to the large-scale experiments.

Picture: Takahiro Ishizaki.

Read more: MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Takahiro Ishizaki

Celebrating World Mosquito Day and its importance

Written by Nóra Lehotai.

World Mosquito Day has been celebrated on 20th August worldwide since 1897. That day, Sir Ronald Ross, a British doctor stationed in India, made the groundbreaking discovery which enabled the future of malaria research: malaria is transmitted from mosquitos to humans only by female mosquitos. He declared this day to be known as “World Mosquito Day” and for his scientific achievements, Ross received the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1902.

"On World Mosquito Day, I reflect on these annoying flies” - says Claire Sayers, a postdoctoral researcher in Oliver Billker’s group. “While only female mosquitoes bite us to produce eggs, they also feed on nectar and act as pollinators. Mosquitoes have an ecological role, but some species are vectors for deadly diseases such as malaria. Mosquitoes are known as the world’s deadliest animal with over a million people dying from mosquito-borne diseases each year. The WHO estimated that 409,000 people died from malaria in 2019. I study the transmission stages of malaria parasites to better understand how they infect mosquitoes to spread the disease."

Mozzis Claire Sayers reduced

Pictures of mosquitos taken by Claire Sayers. All credits: Claire Sayers. 

Read more: Celebrating World Mosquito Day and its importance

A breakthrough publication from Anne-Marie Fors Connolly: Increased risk of acute myocardial infarction and stroke following COVID-19

 Text written by Anne-Marie Fors Connolly and Nóra Lehotai.

Lancet ANMFC2021 30255128 heart attack concept

Photo: Myocardial infarction. Credit: Mostphotos.

A large nationwide study based on all COVID-19 patients in Sweden performed at Umeå University, concludes that the risk of acute myocardial infarction and stroke is three-fold increased the first two weeks following COVID-19. The study was published in The Lancet.

COVID-19 is a complex disease that affects many organs, and we therefore aimed to determine if COVID-19 is an acute risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and stroke, says Anne-Marie Fors Connolly who is a MIMS Clinical Research Fellow, a principal investigator at the Dept. of Clinical Microbiology, and responsible for the study.

Read more: A breakthrough publication from Anne-Marie Fors Connolly: Increased risk of acute myocardial...

Two MIMS postdocs awarded fellowships from the Swedish Society for Medical Research

Written by Marta Nieckarz, Atin Sharma and Nóra Lehotai. Pictures: Marta Nieckarz and Atin Sharma. Credit: Marta Nieckarz and Atin Sharma.

Marta N and Atin Sh 2021 postodc fellowship

Marta Nieckarz and Atin Sharma received a three-year fellowship for postdoctoral studies in medical science from the Swedish Society for Medical Research (Svenska Sällskapet för Medicinsk Forskning, SSMF). Marta and Atin are both postdoctoral researchers at MIMS, Umeå University. Marta is a member of the Cava lab (group leader: Felipe Cava) and Atin is a member of the Puhar lab (group leader: Andrea Puhar).

Read more: Two MIMS postdocs awarded fellowships from the Swedish Society for Medical Research

MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Anna Överby Wernstedt

Text written by Nóra Lehotai and Anna Överby Wernstedt. Pictures: 1) Anna Överby Wernstedt, credit: Mattias Petterson, 2) Work in the Överby lab, credit: Mattias Petterson.

This is a MIMS Spotlight Series Extra article before the longer summer break. I chatted with Anna Överby Wernstedt, who is now a rather senior MIMS group leader. She was born and raised in Sweden and during her studies and career so far, she has lived in Scotland, Canada, the USA and Germany, to return to Sweden and join MIMS in 2011. Her life is full with activities, which she shares with her husband and their two children. 

AÖ

Can you tell us about your role at MIMS, what are you working on now? 

I am a MIMS Group Leader,but as my 9 years-period is up, I am justfinishing the leftover funding for a postdoc in my group and will take up a new association within MIMS.My research field is virologyspecialized in virus-host interactions. I am supervising a group of 9 people, and we are working with tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus and other mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses, and during the last year, it has been a lot of COVID and SARS research which means that a third of the lab switched to work on that topic and the rest of the group continued to do TBE research. 

Read more: MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Anna Överby Wernstedt

MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Stefanie Willekens

Text written by Nóra Lehotai and Stefanie Willekens. Pictures owned by Stefanie Willekens. 

I had a chat with Stefanie, who joined the Överby lab in February 2021 as a postdoctoral fellow. However, she was no stranger to Umeå by that time. Stefanie has a Belgian nationality and has lived in the Netherlands, Denmark and Sweden throughout her career. She shares her life with her dog, motorbike and an impressive stiletto collection.

Can you tell us about your role at MIMS, what are you working on now? 

SW 1I am working in Anna Överby’s group, mainly on flaviviruses, but I am the only one in Anna’s group who is not a virologist. I have a
background in imaging. I did my PhD in nucleo imaging, so I am someone who is more specialized in image processing. I am developing new imaging strategies for visualizing viral spread in neurotropic viruses in the brain. In short: brain mapping of virus infection, what type of viruses and what do they cause in the brain and how to visualize that with imaging techniques, this is my main topic.

 

Read more: MIMS Spotlight Series: Meet Stefanie Willekens

Emmanuelle Charpentier took the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Emmanuelle has been awarded jointly with Jennifer Doudna the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discovering the groundbreaking CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology. She is a former group leader at MIMS, honorary doctor at Umeå University and former visiting professor at UCMR.

Movie by Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (https://kaw.wallenberg.org/)

Battling antibiotic resistance

movie by Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, with participation of scientists from MIMS and UCMR:
Or watch the original movie on:
https://kaw.wallenberg.org/

Research about infectious diseases:

Oliver Billker in movie of Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation:
Or watch the original movie on:
https://kaw.wallenberg.org/

footer all slides 2014-02-06


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